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Windows That Work For Your Space

There are infinite possibilities for creating the perfect window to suit your home and needs. Today, we’re going to talk about six different window styles and how the way they open can make them the best choice for your space.

Connect Indoor and Outdoor Living Spaces

To get the most out of Kentucky’s great climate, the key is to marry your indoor and outdoor spaces. We believe that the best way to achieve this is through the right door (or sometimes, the right door and window combination)! Let’s look at some options.

Historic Districts and Landmarks

Renovating a historic home is one of the most fun and exciting projects you can undertake as a homeowner. Whether you’re modernizing an older home or staying true to the original design, remodeling historic homes can be a huge undertaking. We recently helped our client Stephanie with the windows in her historic Clifton renovation.

Image of window and couch set up.

Our coworker, Karen, was able to get a Marvin window for her Crescent Hill house that perfectly matched the original window.

In Louisville, portions of your project may be subject to review by the Historic Landmarks and Preservation Districts Commission. There are seven local historic preservation districts in Louisville (Butchertown, Cherokee Triangle, Clifton, Limerick, Old Louisville, Parkland, and West Main Street), as well as individual landmarks.

This charming Clifton bungalow is one of countless historic district homes the Door Store and Windows has helped to restore.

To learn more about the process, we talked with Becky Gorman, who works for Planning and Design Services and is staff to the Historic Landmarks and Preservation Districts Commission. She says that the best place to start with any exterior changes to a home in a historic preservation district is with a call to the Landmarks Planning and Design Department at (502) 574- 6230. Simply explain that you have questions about windows or doors and ask to speak to a Landmarks staff member, who will walk you through what you need to do to get started, the process of getting approved, and the design guidelines for your area.

This sweet Highlands home required craftsman-style windows in a range of sizes, as you can see!

You can also do preliminary research online. On the Historic Preservation and Urban Design website you can find design guidelines for each district and the review process for a Certificate of Appropriateness (COA).  A COA is the permit needed for exterior changes, and to obtain one, you’ll need to submit a Landmarks application. Your Landmarks application will be reviewed by a case manager, who will help guide you through the process of making any exterior changes to your home. For Stephanie, it included the recommendation that a contractor could repair her original street-facing windows.

Dark, tall, and elegant windows set this stately Highland Avenue home apart. Historical accuracy does NOT mean dull!

The Historic Landmarks and Preservation Districts Commission Design Guidelines prefer that historic elements (like original windows) are maintained rather than replaced unless there’s a serious issue that can’t be fixed. For Stephanie, this meant repairing the windows facing the street, which she was just as happy to get fixed. “I love the fact that these windows are original,” she says. “They have that charming old wavy glass.”

With the front-facing windows in the process of being repaired, Stephanie contacted Door Store and Windows to address the windows on the side and rear of her home. “I knew that Door Store and Windows had a reputation for being able to match existing windows and that Marvin was great at historical replacements.”

We worked with the owner of this brick Belknap cottage to select deep red divided light windows throughout.

Our Window and Door Replacement Specialist Mark was able to assist Stephanie in selecting a window style that matched her original windows, including selecting a wood stain that matched her interior trim. Ultimately, Stephanie was not only able to get Marvin windows that perfectly matched the originals, she was also able to get sleek, low-profile storm windows to protect the 95-year-old windows on the front of her house.

This magnificent Cherokee home required dozens of uniquely shaped and historically accurate windows.

The most important thing to remember when renovating a home in a historic district is that for exterior renovations, like doors and windows, there are special steps you must take to complete your project. If you’re considering beginning renovations on your historic district home, visit the website of the Historic Landmarks and Preservation Districts Commission.

If you have questions about historic replacement windows or doors, contact Door Store and Windows to learn more, or stop by our showroom to see all of our unique designs.

Intentionally Inconsistent: Mixed Hardware Finishes

A recent customer approached us about her St. Matthews home. The home was built in the early 1930s and her recent renovation aimed to modernize it, while keeping the original aesthetic in place. A challenge? Not really.

There is no rule that says all hardware within a home must match. In fact, adding different finishes around the house, when done thoughtfully, can really add a new layer of design and interest within a home.

For this client, she was intentional not only about design, but also about her specific needs as related to both window and door hardware throughout the interior and exterior of the home.

Brushed nickel hardware on the window matches the stainless steel appliances in the kitchen.

With stainless steel appliances in the kitchen, she felt brushed nickel hardware worked best and maintained consistency throughout the room. In other parts of the house, darker hardware was used due to touches of dark accents in each room.

Oil-rubbed bonze is considered a “living finish.”

On her beautifully adorned brand-new back patio, she brought in the darker hardware with an oil-rubbed bronze. Oil-rubbed bronze is what’s known as a “living finish” which means it is uncoated with a sealant and will naturally oxidize over time to show a unique patina on the finish. It will transform slightly over time through exposure to the environment and regular use. Some refer to a living finish as a way for hardware to age gracefully, adding personality and charm to the doorknob over the years. This works in this beautiful space.

Dark bronze is sealed and perfect for doors in high-traffic areas.

For a more utilitarian approach, she selected a dark bronze doorknob for what is probably the door with the heaviest usage. Her side door is where she most enters the house from the car as she comes and goes throughout each day. For this reason, the dark bronze is the right fit as it is sealed and no patina or aging is expected. The color on a dark bronze piece of hardware will remain constant for years to come.

Finally, the question became what to do with the hardware on her front door. Original to the home, this brass doorknob really seemed to work. Our salesperson guided the homeowner to keep what “wasn’t broken” and continue using this ornate door knob which really serves as a jewel to the home – and it works with the design and in conjunction with the rest of the house. A nod to the past, this doorknob reminds all who enter that although this home is updated and current, it has a history which should be respected and enjoyed throughout all of its future generations.

The original brass doorknob adds character and charm to the home.

If you are considering updating the hardware throughout your home, consider adding different finishes to meet your needs and work with your design. Our designers can help guide you to select the right choices that will bring you happiness every time you enter a room!

Exterior Design Inspiration by Door Store and Windows

Looking for exterior design inspiration? Door Store and Windows can help. Take a look at these gorgeous homes with Door Store and Windows products and find something that you’ll love.

Belknap Neighborhood Doors and Windows:
Full windows and doors on this fantastic Belknap brick home completely refreshed the look and feel of the exterior. The red is simply striking.

Vibrant Highlands Douglass Front Door:
This enchanting cherry red door highlights the rusty tones of this beautiful Highlands brick house. A bold color choice creates a warm and welcoming entrance.

Beechwood Village Florida Room:
Soak up the summer and warm up your winter with a Florida room like this one we replaced in Beechwood Village. These stunning, energy efficient windows maximize sunlight and bring the outdoors in without sacrificing comfort.

Indian Hills French Doors:
Simple, classic, functional, and striking. Look at how these Marvin French Doors transformed this Indian Hills indoor/outdoor entertaining space.

Crescent Hill Doors:
A new sliding patio door, front door, and side door. Refresh and modernize every entrance like we did on this Crescent Hill home for added security, energy efficiency, and beauty with a lifetime guarantee.

Highlands Curb Appeal:
This stunning Highlands home is the perfect example of how we take advantage of what the house already has. These gigantic, historically inspired windows blend elegantly with the existing architecture and provide ample natural light.

To view more amazing before and after photos, visit our Before & After Gallery

Eight Small Details that Made a Huge Difference in my Remodel

A substantial remodel can completely change the look and feel of a home. With a lengthy project it can feel like one big decision after another, but don’t overlook or underestimate small details that can make a tremendous difference. Recently we worked with a client on a back-porch remodel that was chock full of little details.

Now that their renovation is complete, our client shared with us eight small details that made a huge difference to their remodel:

  1. Porch Ceiling: I chose to paint the porch ceiling a gentle blue color, partly because it’s a Southern tradition, but also because it matches my living room walls just inside. The color matching conveys a feeling of seamlessness between the indoor and outdoor areas, making the porch seem like an extension of my living room.
  2. Window Trim: In place of sidelights, I chose to put two skinny double-hung windows on either side of my patio door. When they installed the windows, they put a raised panel below the windowsill offering me a deep ledge and a beautiful decorative accent on the wall. My contractor also made custom plinth blocks to match the rest of the trim.
  3. Ceiling Fans: I chose to install contemporary fans in my otherwise traditional home. They’re beautiful, but also a statement piece. Similar to the blue paint color, I chose to have my inside and outside fans match. This supports the feeling of continuity between the indoor and outdoor living spaces.
  4. Patio Door: In order to maximize my space and to allow for a flat threshold, I chose an outswing patio door. I couldn’t have a screen door, but the outswing allowed me more flexibility with my interior design. Plus, the doors lay flat outside when they’re open, so they don’t take up porch space.
  5. Interior Wood: I chose a dark interior wood color for my windows and doors. The contrast is striking and really makes the beauty of the doors and windows stand out. If I’d chosen white, the doors would have blandly faded into the wall.
  6. Hardware: For my patio doors, I wanted to choose a dark hardware that wouldn’t show dirt as these doors will get a lot of use. I decided to go with an oil-rubbed bronze. An oil-rubbed bronze finish can turn, particularly in the sunlight, but since this patio door is in the shade, it was a great choice.
  7. Mismatch: Throughout my remodel, I’ve chosen windows of varying sizes, shapes, and heights. I never wanted all of the windows in my house to match. The windows and the patio door don’t line up perfectly, and I’m happy with that. I think the end result is eclectic and charming.
  8. Flashing: I’ve always loved the look of copper, and I’ve always wanted copper gutters. When the doors and windows were installed, I decided to get copper flashing above the patio door and patio gable window. This is a small detail that you might not notice at first glance, but it helps tie everything together and makes the space feel complete.

There you have it! Eight small details made a huge difference to the final product. Curious in reading more about this remodel? Check out our case study by clicking here.

Learn more about this project from the contractor, Todd Stengel, in this video!

From advising you on the swing of your patio door to ordering custom double hung windows that fit just perfectly in your space, Door Store and Windows can help your home remodel come to life. To get started on the project of your dreams, give us a call at (502) 822-5424 today!

The Curious Ways Windows Open

Right now you’re probably wondering if we really need instructions on something as basic as opening windows. But, if you’ve been researching new or replacement windows in the Louisville area, you’ve likely learned that there are hundreds of types, styles, and materials on the market. There are even multiple ways to open them. We’re here to help you dig through the all of the information so that you can understand the basic functions of each window type, and which may be best for your home.

Let’s start with 5 of the most popular types of windows, and explore how they open:

Double Hung Windows are one of the most common window types you will find. They feature top and bottom sashes that both open, and allow you to double your ventilation. These classic windows are also available with a half round or an elliptical upper sash.

Click here to see Laurie Scarborough, one of our owners, demonstrate these windows.

Picture Windows are typically fixed windows that do not open. They get their name because they are clear glass that is situated in the home to look out at something you’d like to see, so as to frame your view. Much like a picture. Thus, the name.

You may be surprised to learn that we have a “fake fixed” picture window in our Shelbyville Road showroom. Laurie has more on these tricky windows HERE.

Casement Windows are found in homes of all ages all over Louisville. A casement window is a window with a sash that is hinged. While the most common type is hinged on the side, hinges can also be placed on the top or bottom. Many casement windows have cranks, but in those found in older homes in areas such as the Highlands—you’ll find casement windows that work when pushed out.

A great, but less common, type of casement window is one that is hinged at the top. We most often recommend these for a bathroom space, as the top hinge and obscure glass offer both ventilation and privacy. Let Laurie show you more on opening these windows HERE.

Gliding Windows are windows that function much like a sliding door, sliding or gliding into place on a track. If you live in a Mid-Century Modern home — built in the 1950’s or 1960’s — you may have this type of window. If so, we can help replace your windows while staying true to your home’s architectural integrity.

The gliding window in our showroom is a bi-parting sliding window, that opens in both directions.  Laurie has more on opening gliding windows HERE.

Tilt Turn Windows are one of the more fun and unique window options. These were designed and engineered in Europe…and found all over the continent. Tilt Turn windows work in two ways, the first is much like a door. In fact, in Europe they are often large enough to function as a door as well as a window. The second function works by tilting the window upward and in for ventilation. It looks much like a hopper window, with the hinges at the bottom.

Laurie has more on opening these unique windows HERE.

As you have seen, there are a lot of ways to open your windows! New windows can enhance the beauty of your home, improve its value, as well as help reduce energy costs and maintenance. We hope this information has helped you understand the various functions a bit better. If you’re ready to take the next step in buying new windows for your home, give us a call. We’d love to help. Interested in reading some more of our content? Check out our blog about choosing the perfect exterior window shutters for your home!

How to Choose the Right Exterior Window Shutters for your Home

Exterior window shutters have a long history gracing windows before glass was readily available or affordable. Wood shutters served to protect the window opening, provide privacy, add additional insulation during winter and block the sun in the summer. As window technology has improved, shutters are used less for these purposes and more as a decorative feature for your home’s exterior.

Shutters are available in operable and non-operable styles. Design selection, sizing and installation is very important for operable shutters, especially for maintaining historical accuracy. If you have a home that calls for operable exterior shutters or if you have an older home and you want historically correct shutters, come see us to discuss your options. We would really want to see your home as part of the shutter selection process.

Here are a few tips for selecting shutters for your home:

 

Match Your Shutter To Your Home Style

The shutter that is historically accurate for a Victorian home is not the same shutter for an Arts and Crafts home. Check out homes in your neighborhood and decide which style works best for your home. Many of today’s architectural styles are based on historic styles, so keep your home facade true to it’s architectural style.

Louvered – Historically accurate installation will call for louvers to offer rain protection when closed. We’ve become so accustomed to shutters remaining open that today’s louvered shutters are often installed so that rain protection is provided when open. Not exactly useful, but visually, we’ve grown to accept this look. Louvers can be fixed or movable and can be designed as full louvered or louvered/panel combination.

Board and Batten – Generally consisting of several boards mounted vertically with horizontal or “Z” cross bracing and traditionally used on barn-styled homes for a rustic country feel.

 

Solid Panel and Raised Panel – Panel shutters are identified by the number of panels on each shutter. Three panel shutters generally have a small panel on top, a larger panel in the middle and the largest panel on the bottom. Panel sizes can differ based on the size of the shutter.

 

Bermuda or Bahama – These shutters are mounted much like an awning over the window. Generally found in coastal areas, bermuda shutters offer a Caribbean style with protection from the hot rays of the sun.

 

Correctly Size Your Shutters

Shutters should be sized to cover the window if closed and convey the believable appearance of actually being usable even if theyare non-operable. Also, the shutters should mirror image the window. Rails should line up with the lock rail, transom, muntin or other architectural elements of the window. Often, we see shutters mounted upside down…probably a careless reinstall after painting or maintenance.

 

Select A Material That Suits Your Lifestyle

Shutters are available in a variety of materials including wood, pultruded fiberglass, high density structural PVC and other composite materials. Wood provides an authentic look and many people love the unique character multiple coats of paint give a old wooden shutter. Shutters can be made with from woods such as cedar, cypress and African mahogany for decay-resistance while composite materials can offer you freedom from painting and other maintenance.

Watch Out For These Pitfalls…

 

Trend Watch: Dark Interior Windows

Are you ready to make a statement in your home? Consider adding definition with one of the latest trends in windows — but one that is here to stay — dark windows.

Make A Statement

All black or dark-colored windows can add dimension and depth, while mixed finishes offer a more classic look. It’s one that can help set a window apart in a space and add a touch of statement-making drama to your room.

The New Design Rule

As our friends at Marvin Windows like to say, “The new design rules are that there are no rules.” Using a black or dark colored sash will make your windows stand out, create some contrast and frame your view.

Don’t want to change all of your windows? No worries. “If someone doesn’t want to commit to changing all of the windows, I recommend changing a set of windows or room to create a focal point,” suggests Design Consultant Karen Lamontagne. “ Have a big bay window in the front? Use a dark sash to draw attention to it.”

Mixing Styles

Louisville is a traditional town, filled with many traditional homes. However, even in our town, today’s interior aesthetics are trending toward more modern looks. A black or dark window sash is a great way to mix a modern look into a traditional home. Grilles on glass and divided lites are still popular here. Don’t worry, this look still works.

“Dark windows add a decorative element, almost like a piece of art. A dark window with white trim around it can enhance the beauty of a room,” says Lamontagne.

 

 

No Extra Work Required

Our windows come from our partners at Marvin Windows and Doors pre-finished, primed and painted, or stained and polyurethaned. This means there is little or no work required on your part to achieve this look. But, if for some reason you wish to change the look down the road, the interior of these windows are wood. So, it’s as easy as paint.

Remember, when you choose The Door Store and Windows as your design and installation partner, you are not just picking a window off of a shelf. You are entrusting your windows to experts who will partner with you to provide direction and design expertise. We will help you decide which options are best for your home.

So, if you haven’t already seen and fallen in love with this look, chances are that you will soon. When you do, give us a call! Did you enjoy reading this? We bet you’ll love our blog about how new windows can save you money on your power bill!

Before & After: Door Expertise Makes A Difference

We encountered a situation where the wrong door was used for a new home resulting in door failure after only seven years…