Exterior Design Inspiration by Door Store and Windows

Looking for exterior design inspiration? Door Store and Windows can help. Take a look at these gorgeous homes with Door Store and Windows products and find something that you’ll love.

Belknap Neighborhood Doors and Windows:
Full windows and doors on this fantastic Belknap brick home completely refreshed the look and feel of the exterior. The red is simply striking.

Vibrant Highlands Douglass Front Door:
This enchanting cherry red door highlights the rusty tones of this beautiful Highlands brick house. A bold color choice creates a warm and welcoming entrance.

Beechwood Village Florida Room:
Soak up the summer and warm up your winter with a Florida room like this one we replaced in Beechwood Village. These stunning, energy efficient windows maximize sunlight and bring the outdoors in without sacrificing comfort.

Indian Hills French Doors:
Simple, classic, functional, and striking. Look at how these Marvin French Doors transformed this Indian Hills indoor/outdoor entertaining space.

Crescent Hill Doors:
A new sliding patio door, front door, and side door. Refresh and modernize every entrance like we did on this Crescent Hill home for added security, energy efficiency, and beauty with a lifetime guarantee.

Highlands Curb Appeal:
This stunning Highlands home is the perfect example of how we take advantage of what the house already has. These gigantic, historically inspired windows blend elegantly with the existing architecture and provide ample natural light.

To view more amazing before and after photos, visit our Before & After Gallery

Eight Small Details that Made a Huge Difference in my Remodel

A substantial remodel can completely change the look and feel of a home. With a lengthy project it can feel like one big decision after another, but don’t overlook or underestimate small details that can make a tremendous difference. Recently we worked with a client on a back-porch remodel that was chock full of little details.

Now that their renovation is complete, our client shared with us eight small details that made a huge difference to their remodel:

  1. Porch Ceiling: I chose to paint the porch ceiling a gentle blue color, partly because it’s a Southern tradition, but also because it matches my living room walls just inside. The color matching conveys a feeling of seamlessness between the indoor and outdoor areas, making the porch seem like an extension of my living room.
  2. Window Trim: In place of sidelights, I chose to put two skinny double-hung windows on either side of my patio door. When they installed the windows, they put a raised panel below the windowsill offering me a deep ledge and a beautiful decorative accent on the wall. My contractor also made custom plinth blocks to match the rest of the trim.
  3. Ceiling Fans: I chose to install contemporary fans in my otherwise traditional home. They’re beautiful, but also a statement piece. Similar to the blue paint color, I chose to have my inside and outside fans match. This supports the feeling of continuity between the indoor and outdoor living spaces.
  4. Patio Door: In order to maximize my space and to allow for a flat threshold, I chose an outswing patio door. I couldn’t have a screen door, but the outswing allowed me more flexibility with my interior design. Plus, the doors lay flat outside when they’re open, so they don’t take up porch space.
  5. Interior Wood: I chose a dark interior wood color for my windows and doors. The contrast is striking and really makes the beauty of the doors and windows stand out. If I’d chosen white, the doors would have blandly faded into the wall.
  6. Hardware: For my patio doors, I wanted to choose a dark hardware that wouldn’t show dirt as these doors will get a lot of use. I decided to go with an oil-rubbed bronze. An oil-rubbed bronze finish can turn, particularly in the sunlight, but since this patio door is in the shade, it was a great choice.
  7. Mismatch: Throughout my remodel, I’ve chosen windows of varying sizes, shapes, and heights. I never wanted all of the windows in my house to match. The windows and the patio door don’t line up perfectly, and I’m happy with that. I think the end result is eclectic and charming.
  8. Flashing: I’ve always loved the look of copper, and I’ve always wanted copper gutters. When the doors and windows were installed, I decided to get copper flashing above the patio door and patio gable window. This is a small detail that you might not notice at first glance, but it helps tie everything together and makes the space feel complete.

There you have it! Eight small details made a huge difference to the final product. Curious in reading more about this remodel? Check out our case study by clicking here.

Learn more about this project from the contractor, Todd Stengel, in this video!

From advising you on the swing of your patio door to ordering custom double hung windows that fit just perfectly in your space, Door Store and Windows can help your home remodel come to life. To get started on the project of your dreams, give us a call at (502) 822-5424 today!

Quality Products Deserve Quality Installation: A Step-by-Step Guide to Our Door Installation Process

You’re probably curious about the installation process and how much time it will take. Our number one priority is customer satisfaction and 100% transparency with our customers. We are proud to say that most of our door installation projects take one day to complete.

Icy Windows and Doors: The Cobbler’s Children Need New Shoes

We’ve all heard the old adage about the cobbler who is so busy providing shoes for everyone in the town that his own children do not have adequate footwear. We seem to have a cobbler in our midst, Laurie Scarborough, our co-owner. This is the story of her older windows and door.

Written Sunday, New Year’s Eve, temperature 16°

Like you, my husband Kevin and I are weathering this icy-cold blast this freezing New Year’s Eve in Kentuckiana. Today, our 1960s-built home turned up some interesting problems before we were out of our pajamas.

In the spirit of keeping this post to windows and doors, I won’t mention the near miss in our laundry room, and the almost frozen pipe. I know many have experienced those in the last week. The real reason for this message is to share the problems we noticed with the older windows and doors in our home. We hope that it helps those of you with similar issues.

It might be time to replace this huge window.

We have been updating our home over the last few years and have one more window to replace. It’s an architectural element on the front of the house — a huge 14’ x 12’ bow window. Bow windows are designed to create space by projecting beyond the exterior wall in an arch. It has been the topic of many conversations both at home and in the office — how to replace it, with what will it be replaced, and the proverbial ‘when.’ We have caulked, painted and babied the window for as long as possible. The real impact of this wall-length window to our heating bill and physical comfort has become very evident during this cold snap.

The window is single-pane glass. It’s been so cold this week that the internal humidity is freezing on the inside of the window. Ultimately this moisture causes the paint, glazing, and wood to deteriorate. This means wood rot! With wood rot you generally experience drafts and, if the rot is extensive, a strong wind could blow the glass out. 

If you see problems like these pictures, it’s time to have your windows replaced.

TIP from this local window and door dealer: You do not have to replace all your windows at the same time.  We have replaced our windows and doors over the course of many years. You can too.

Wait – the door too?

Unfortunately, this window is not the only issue that presented itself with the cold. Our front door is 30+ years old. For the first time we discovered ice on our threshold (at the bottom of the door.) 

The threshold is brass and the weather stripping on the bottom of the door is also metal. Although we don’t feel a draft, the metal conducts the freezing temperature. This, combined with the internal humidity, causes icing on the interior section of the threshold. In addition, we have seal failure in the decorative glass. Ice buildup can be seen there too.

A new door system with a threshold and “compression” weather stripping, made with composite and synthetic materials, will quickly solve these problems. Today’s doors are very energy efficient.

With all of these developments, we have been working on plans to update the front of our home — both the bow window and the front entry door.

Seven Steps To Ease Your Fears About Cold Weather Installation

The first blast of winter is upon us and the chill inside your home tells you your windows or doors need to be replaced. Don’t put it off until better weather arrives. We’ll protect your home from the elements during installation and new windows or doors will make your home comfortable year-round.

Installation Manager Craig Rowe and Lead Installer Steve Hudson outline our process for cold weather installs:

1. We Plan Ahead.

Planning ahead will keep us from going in and out of the house unnecessarily and limits the amount of time your door or window opening is uncovered. This includes making sure we have adequate plastic for temporary walls (if necessary), plenty of floor protection pads and a thermos of hot coffee! Caulk, foam insulation, and weather barrier membrane are moved to a warm area to keep them ready-to-use.

2. We Protect Your Home From Dirt and Weather.

Floor padding protects against dirt, snow, water or construction debris that might be tracked into the house. Plastic is hung over nearby openings to reduce the amount of cold air entering the home and to reduce dust transmission. Plastic or padding is placed on any surface or object in the installation area to prevent damage and protect from dust. Delicate hanging items are removed from nearby walls. When possible, temporary weather barriers are created using spring loaded posts and plastic sheeting to close off the installation area from the rest of the house. We also check that all tools and supplies are in place before work begins.

3. We Work On One Opening At A Time.

It might be more efficient to do it differently, but in cold or other extreme weather conditions, we work on one opening at a time to reduce the weather exposure inside your home. And we don’t stop working on that opening until it is filled.

We don’t stop working on an opening until it is filled…even if it means we work through lunch, darkness or whatever it takes.

– Door Store and Windows Install Team

4. We Make Sure The New Product Is Ready.

New product pre-install preparation, such as the removal of packaging and wrapping materials, is completed prior to the removal of the old product so the new product is ready to install.

5. We Double Check Everything.

Prior to removing the old product, we double-check the opening measurements to make sure it will accept the new product. We also check the product against your contract specifications to ensure the right product is being installed. Double-checking keeps us from fully removing the old product only to be surprised if it doesn’t fit.

6. We Remove The Old Product…Quickly!

The extra time we spend double-checking the product and opening size usually allows us to quickly remove the old product and immediately begin prepping the opening for the new product. Once the old product is removed, the opening is thoroughly cleared of debris.

7. We Place The New Product…Quickly!

The ready-to-install product is placed into the opening and final installation begins. This critical step involves attention to detail to ensure a proper weather barrier is created. The product is leveled, shimmed and fastened. Expanding foam is added in the gaps between the product and the opening to create a lasting weather-tight seal. Final installation details such as installing trim and adding hardware is completed and your new window or door is ready to make your home more comfortable.

If you’re ready to make your home more comfortable with new windows or doors, give us a call. We’ll ease your fears about cold weather installation and make sure your experience is outstanding.

6 Things To Consider When Purchasing Scenic Doors

Spring has sprung, and the weather is finally warm! Are you ready to open up your home to the outdoors? Indoor/outdoor living is key in warmer months, and can translate well in the colder months too. Scenic doors are becoming increasingly popular, offering extended openings with a large covering of glass that increases the natural light flowing into a space and allows for expanded views of the outdoors.

What are the critical factors you should consider when purchasing a scenic door? We’re here to help:

  1. Budget: A scenic door is larger than a standard patio door – starting at 9’ wide going up to 40’ wide and 10’ tall – so they will cost more than regular swinging or sliding doors.
  2. Primary function: Will the door be used for entry/exit or primarily as a space divider? Options like the Marvin Ultimate Multi Slide Door is a panoramic door that offers expansive views, but may not be practical if being used as a primary point of entry.
  3. Opening: Is the existing opening large enough, and the wall deep enough to accept a scenic door? Most homes do not have the large openings required to receive these larger doors. A remodel or new construction project each offer perfect opportunities to achieve the open feeling of bringing the outdoors inside a great-room or kitchen.
  4. Proper overhang: Marvin Scenic Doors are designed to keep the weather out. But, since these are very large doors, extreme weather could be a factor. A proper overhang will help protect your doors and home from the elements.
  5. Style: Is your architectural design more contemporary or traditional? With the array of options available, this is a deciding factor. Our design team is happy to help with your selection.
  6. Floor covering: Will the floor be the same inside and out or will the door separate two different floors? Ideally the flooring will be the same height on both sides of the door. If they will be different, you will want to consult with your builder/remodeler on your best options.

“The impact these doors have on a home is difficult to explain. I met a builder and homeowners at their home to discuss some hardware issues. The builder and I were talking as the homeowners arrived. They walked to their new Bi-fold door going from the family room to the patio and I could not count the number of times they said WOW. Clearly this would be the focal point of their home.” – Jim Platt, New Construction Specialist, Door Store and Windows.

Ready to make this kind of impact in your home? Give us a call.

Patio Door Transformation Brings the Outdoors in

We spent a couple of days last winter getting this patio door ready for the outdoor season in Louisville. The original patio door (shown above) was a single door with a window to the side – not exactly a show stopper. With fantastic deck space, the home owners wanted something more dazzling to transition from indoors to outdoors.

So we helped them design this beauty. Basically, a door with two full width sidelites, this patio door truly transforms the space between indoors and outdoors and better suits the deck space in scale and size. And when the homeowners saw it for the first time, they fell in love again with their patio space.

 

Check Out Our Video Series On Patio Doors

 

 

 

Our employee-installers are experienced craftsmen and created a new opening that looks like it belonged on the house all along. And what they do behind the scenes during installation is what creates real value in this door project. Preparing the door opening to accept the door involves more than removing some bricks in this case. Proper shimming and weather barrier installation will prevent moisture and rot and is how we are able to provide a lifetime installation warranty…part of our Worry-Free Guarantee.

Call today to get your patio door project ready for summer and fall. Our design consultants are here to help you get exactly what you want.

How to Solve Three Simple Cold Weather Door Problems

Cold weather can bring previously unknown door problems to your attention. These problems can come from older doors or even from doors installed in the past five years.

Sometimes the problems – like the three problems below – are very simple to fix. Other times, there could be underlying structural issues that only an expert can identify. We’re always happy to stop in and take a look at your situation. And, if you buy your doors from The Door Store and Windows, they are backed by a lifetime installation warranty that covers adjustments and other issues.

Let’s take a look at simple fixes to three common problems…

Problem: Draft Coming From Bottom of Door

Solution: If the weatherstripping (or sweep) at the bottom of the door is not damaged, this problem can usually be fixed by a simple adjustment of the threshold – if your door has this feature. If you see four screwheads or caps (screws are under the caps) on your threshold, it’s probably adjustable. Simply turn the screws to raise the threshold so it forms a good seal against the door bottom sweep. Tighten it just enough so that when closed, you can’t easily pull a dollar bill from between the door bottom sweep and threshold. This problem can also be indicative of other, more significant problems like rot or structural failure; so if you have concerns, please call in a door expert.

Problem: Frost or Condensation on Interior Door Hardware

Solution: If your interior doorknob or handle set is frosty, wet or unusually cold, one cause could be loose hardware. Exuberant kids, heavy usage and improper installation can all result in loose hardware that does not seal the door knob hole. Small air leaks can allow cold air to meet warm, moist air and form frost or ice. Make sure your door hardware is centered in the door knob hole completely covering the hole and then tighten all screws on your door hardware.

Problem: Frost or Ice on Interior of French Double Doors

Solution: French double doors typically have an active door (with lock hardware) and a passive door (locks in place using top and bottom slide bolts). If the passive door is not properly locked in place with both top and bottom slide bolts, an air gap can develop that allows cold air into the home. This photo shows a French double door in which the bottom bolt was not properly locked into place. The top bolt can also slide out of position easily when the bolt mechanism becomes too loose from heavy use. When these slide bolts are not locked into place top AND bottom, a security risk is also created. A hard kick to the door will usually allow an intruder easy access into the home.

 

Before & After: Door Expertise Makes A Difference

We encountered a situation where the wrong door was used for a new home resulting in door failure after only seven years…

Rules of Proportion and Scale For Windows and Doors

Have you ever seen a home with windows or an entry door that just didn’t look right? We see them all the time and offer design assistance to help homeowners understand the importance of proportion and scale when it comes to replacing their windows or entry doors. We don’t just plug one of our products into an opening…we evaluate the relationship of the window or door to the overall architecture and how we can stay true to the architectural integrity or even improve the overall look of the home.

Here’s a quick primer on how proportion and scale impacts your windows and doors.

Window Grids

These “before and after” photos show how selecting the correct grid size can have an overall impact on the proportion and scale of the windows to the home. Our designer suggested a move toward a more open look with larger grid pattern to provide larger daylight openings. Compare the grid patterns on the before and after homes. Notice how “busy” the original windows look when compared to the larger grid used on the replacement windows. (Click image to enlarge)

Here’s another example of how changing window grid sizes creates a cleaner and simpler look to better match the scale and proportions of a home. Not only did the grid sizes differ in the original upper and lower windows, but the lower window grid lines didn’t even line up to the upper window grid lines.

Door Styles

Sometimes the door style should be changed due to proportions of the opening. For instance, the door shown below was changed from a standard height door with two sidelites and a large transom over the door to a taller, double-door configuration with less transom area. The new door was sized to allow a simple half circle transom rather than the odd-sized transom on the original door. The door and transom size change “stretches” the look of the entryway to make it less intimidating and more pleasing to the eye. (Click image to enlarge)

Here’s a situation where the original double doors are not in scale with the home. The doors seem to be squeezed into the opening. Without changing the size of the opening, we suggested a single door with two sidelites to better suit the low ceiling height of the porch. (Click image to enlarge)

If you have a project that needs a good design eye, give us a call. One of our design consultants will visit your home and provide design opinions on how you can achieve the windows or doors of your dreams. Give us a call at 502-896-1717 to get started today. Interested in reading more of our content? Check out our blog about budget conscious window replacement options!